Traditional recipes

Starbucks to add alcohol, food to more units

Starbucks to add alcohol, food to more units


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Starbucks said Monday it will expand its offer of beer, wine and an expanded food menu to a handful of stores in Atlanta and Southern California before the end of 2012.

Five to seven locations in Chicago were already scheduled to offer alcohol and the expanded menu this year in a move to build evening daypart traffic.

Currently, Starbucks offers the options only at five locations in Seattle — the company’s home base — and one in Portland.

The first to test the expanded menu was the Olive Way location in Seattle, which began offering the expanded food and beverage menu in October 2010.

In December, Starbucks officials said units testing the new format have shown double-digit same-store-sales increases after 4 p.m.

Starbucks said the expanded format will be available in four to six units in each market of Atlanta and Southern California. The beer and wine list will be selected to reflect local customer tastes and preferences, the company said.

Food offerings will include savory snacks and small plates, as well as hot flatbreads.

The restaurants will also incorporate more flexible seating to accommodate both individuals and small groups, as well as larger parties like community meetings or book clubs, the company said.

Clarice Turner, Starbucks’ senior vice president, U.S. operations, said building an evening daypart is a natural progression for the coffeehouse chain.

So far the company is pleased with results and eager to test it in new markets, she said.

“As our customers transition from work to home, many are looking for a warm and inviting place to unwind and connect with the people they care about,” Turner said in a statement. “At select stores where it is relevant for the neighborhood, we are focused on creating an atmosphere where our customers can relax with a friend, a small bite to eat and a cup of coffee or glass of wine.”

Contact Lisa Jennings at [email protected]
Follow her on Twitter: @livetodineout


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


What Is the Proof of My Cocktail?

It's easy to tell how strong liquor is because you simply need to read the bottle's label and look for its proof or alcohol by volume (ABV). This will tell you whether the whiskey or vodka you're pouring is the standard 80 proof, or a little higher or lower. Yet, have you ever wondered about the proof of your cocktail?

Things can get complicated when you start combining different liquors with nonalcoholic mixers, shaking it with ice and adding water, and everything else that is required to create great drinks. Unless you are willing to carry a test kit filled with scientific gadgets to the bar, there is no straight answer as to how strong the drink in front of you is in reality.

There is, however, a simple formula that can help you estimate the alcohol content of your mixed drinks. It can also help you decrease or increase a drink's potency if you know a few basic facts.


Watch the video: HOW TO MAKE STARBUCKS ICED COFFEE AT HOME. BRENNA LYONS (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Samubar

    The absurd situation came out

  2. Winwodem

    Between us, I advise you to try google.com

  3. Adom

    Yes indeed. And I ran into this. Let's discuss this issue.

  4. Hakeem

    Wonderful, very precious thing

  5. Pannoowau

    Say at the bottom

  6. Peleus

    What a nice thought

  7. Perth

    Author - hellish sotona !! Walk ischo !!



Write a message